2019 Giant Steps Fatal Shore Pinot Noir

2019 Giant Steps Fatal Shore Pinot Noir

RRP: $75.00 per bottle

$73.99

(buy 6 or more)

$74.99 per single bottle
4 payments of $18.75 with More info
Taste Guarantee
Love it or your money back*
Free Delivery
On orders
over $300*
RRP: $75.00 per bottle

$73.99

(buy 6 or more)

$74.99 per single bottle
Bottles
4 payments of $18.75 with More info
Taste Guarantee
Love it or your money back*
Free Delivery
On orders Over $300*

Expert Reviews

94 Points - Gary Walsh - The Wine FrontDark cherry, plum, spicy biscuit oak, dried rose perfume. It’s fleshy, mouth-filling, though not particularly heavy, thick and silky tannin, even raspberry acidity, and a long insistently silty, slightly ashy tannin finish. Plenty to grab onto, yet it’s still identifiably Pinot Noir.
92 Points - Huon Hooke - The Real ReviewPlenty of purple in the medium to deep colour, the bouquet sweet and blackberry, black-cherry-like. It’s bold and very ripe, with chewy tannins and some alcohol warmth, the finish is firm and upright. Solid, boldly fruit-driven and straightforward, this should take some age to advantage. I suspect it will build complexity if given time.

Tech stuff

Pinot Noir
Giant Steps
Coal River Valley
2019
750ml
Cellar to 2040
Screw Cap

How was it made?

In our obsession with Single Vineyard Pinot Noirs from great Pinot growing areas around the world, we have gone as far south (and as cold) as you can go in this country. Despite the cool temperatures, the sunlight hours are long and intense and we are intrigued by the depth of palate and colour that is possible from this landscape. While it is made with the Giant Steps gentle winemaking approach, the result is clearly a world apart in terroir.

A very cool start to the season was punctuated by a few solid rain events in December that led to healthy dark green canopies. The final stage of the growing season was warmer than average which led to accelerated ripening, and dark colours. Natural acidity across both the clones in the top Pinot blocks was surprisingly high. Fruit was hand sorted in both vineyard and winery. The 19 vintage in southern Tasmania has produced dark brooding textured Pinot Noirs.

Hand picked, straight into a refrigerated container parked on the vineyard. The fruit is then immediately sailed across Bass Strait and we receive it into the winery the following morning. We destem the D clone and cold soak for 3 – 4 days, then allow it to warm to kick start fermentation (Indigenous yeast) in a small open oak vat. The MV6 from the top of the hill was fermented as whole bunches. Both parcels were matured in French oak – 25% new, 75% older – for 8 months in 225L barriques. Racked to blend, no fining, no filtration. Bottled by gravity.

Who made it?

Giant Steps is an independent winery in Healesville, Victoria, owned by Phil Sexton. Phil first made his name in establishing some noted micro-breweries, such as Little Creatures, and later established Devil’s Lair in Margaret River. First released in 2001, Giant Steps focuses exclusively on the distinctive expression of single vineyard sites in the Yarra Valley. Grapes are drawn from estate and leased vineyards, as well as a selection of long-term contracted vineyards. Giant Steps wines are produced fastidiously in the vineyard and vinified with minimal intervention so that each is a faithful expression of site, vintage and culture. Giant Steps focuses on restrained Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and cool climate Cabernet/Merlot blends. These single vineyard wines are sourced from five different vineyards throughout the Yarra, so each is a fingerprint of location and site personality. The name Giant Steps comes in part from Phil’s love for jazz and John Coltrane’s album of that same name, and in part due the Giant Step Phil took in relocating with his family from Margaret River to the Yarra Valley. Giant Steps wines are always exclusively single vineyard Yarra Valley wines. They are hand made in small batches using gravity flow principles. Production of the Giant Steps wines is very limited with some vineyards producing as little as 200 cases each vintage – some wines are not produced each year if vintage conditions do not allow. These wines are often hard to find in retail outlets as they are mainly sold through the cellar door and through selected restaurants.

Not quite what you’re looking for?
Andrew Graham

Wine Guru

Wine is such a subjective beast. My brother might love a wine while I absolutely hate it. But that’s why it’s so fascinating - there is something out there for absolutely everyone! So if you haven’t found something that tickles your fancy, here are a few more potential options: